community

Thursday Extra 4/13: CS Outreach in Grinnell and Central Iowa

Thursday, April 13, 2017
4:15 p.m. in Science 3821
Refreshments at 4:00 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Science 3817).
Everyone is welcome to attend!

Computer Science Outreach in Grinnell and Central Iowa
Ursula Wolz, Noyce Visiting Professor

Please come and learn how YOU can volunteer to bring computer science into the K-12 curriculum during the remainder of the semester and in the coming years. Through the Noyce Professorship, the College has established good relations with Grinnell's public library, middle school, and high school, for both the curriculum and after school activities. Community leaders and Grinnell College students have encouraged collaboration for years, but developing and sustaining this relationship has been challenging. Come and learn how you can contribute to both short-term needs and long-term goals.

Class Presentations: Designing Software to Design Sports Schedules

At 11:00 on Wednesday, December 3, 2014, students in section 1 of CSC 207 will present their work on developing software that creates competition schedules for college athletic teams. Presentations will be in Science 3813.

At first glance, scheduling seems easy. In the standard form, each team must play every other team twice, once home and once away. But real scheduling is much more complicated. For example, some schools may be on a quarter system while others are on a semester system, so not every team can play on the same set of dates. Many teams also have severe restrictions on how far they can travel during weekdays. And when teams play multiple games on a weekend, they typically do all of those games at home or all of those games away. With enough of these kinds of restrictions, forming a schedule that meets all of the restrictions is impossible.

In a sequence of lightning presentations, student project teams will discuss their creative approaches to solving a concrete version of this problem and in generalizing those approaches.

Refreshments will be provided.

Computer Science Table

Computer science table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. Students on meal plans, faculty, and staff are expected to cover the cost of their meals. Visitors to the College and students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Current Schedule (Fall 2017)

This semester, CS Table meets Tuesdays from 12:00-1:00pm in JRC 224B.

  • 8/29: Welcome Back
  • 9/5: Doxing, the public broadcasting of someone's personally identifiable information (PII)
  • 9/12: Machine Ethics
  • 9/19: Activism
  • 9/26: No Topic (concurrent Google session)
  • 10/3: Tapia 2017 Debrief
  • 10/10: Grace Hopper Celebration 2017 Debrief
  • Fall break 10/17: No CS Table
  • 10/24:
  • 10/31:
  • 11/7:
  • 11/14:
  • 11/21:
  • 11/28:

Contact

For questions, comments, and recommendations on topics to cover in CS table, please contact Charlie Curtsinger or Peter-Michael Osera.

Archived Topics for CS Table

2016-2017 series

  • 8/30: Meet and greet
  • 9/6: Passphrases, multi-factor authentication, and security hygiene
  • 9/13: Data privacy in higher education
  • 9/27: Tapia 2016 Debrief
  • 10/11: The intersection of music and computing
  • 11/1: Echochambers
  • 11/8: The state of JavaScript
  • 11/15: Algorithmic bias
  • 11/22: CS education initiatives
  • 11/29: Election hacking
  • 12/5: Health, technology, and regulation
  • 12/12: One-line programs
  • 1/31: Current events and topics for future CS Tables
  • 2/7: Privacy and security
  • 2/14: On technology, slots, and whales (gambling industry)
  • 2/21: Net neutrality
  • 2/28: Facial analysis
  • 3/7: Can computers write poetry?
  • 4/4: Project Gadfly (scripts for contacting elected officials)
  • 4/11: Technical interview process
  • 4/18: Automation
  • 4/25: Algorithmic accountability
  • 5/2: Random number generation
  • 5/9: Comics

2015-2016 series

  • 9/1: Google and elections
  • 9/15: Automobile hacking and cybersecurity
  • 10/27: Debrief after Grace Hopper Celebration
  • 11/10: Cryptographic back doors
  • 11/24: Trans-Pacific Partnership implications for computing and intellectual property
  • 12/8: Comics
  • 2/2: Facebook's Free Basics
  • 2/9: U.S. Copyright duration and fair use: Mickey Mouse, the NFL, and David Bowie
  • 2/16: Data science
  • 2/23: Software patents
  • 3/1: The FBI and Apple
  • 3/8: Public key cryptography
  • 3/15: End-to-end verifiable internet voting
  • 4/12: Data science and elections
  • 4/19: Scrubbing search results, SEO, and the right to be forgotten
  • 4/26: The left-pad kerfluffle (JavaScript node package management)
  • 5/3: Property and ownership of digital media
  • 5/10: End-of-year discussion

2014-2015 series

  • 8/29: Meet and greet
  • 9/12: Social robots and autistic children
  • 9/19: Browser fingerprinting and web tracking
  • 9/26: Privacy, anonymity, and big data in the social sciences
  • 10/3: Serendipity and computing
  • 10/10: Evolutionary art
  • 10/17: Debrief for Grace Hopper Celebration
  • 11/14: "Shellshock" bug
  • 12/5: Back to basics: strings, memory allocation, and databases
  • 1/30: Redundant arrays of inexpensive disks (RAID)
  • 2/20: Onion routing
  • 2/25: "Research priorities for robust and beneficial artificial intelligence"
  • 4/3: Terac-25 incidents (computerized medical devices)
  • 4/24: HTTP 2.0 Standard

2013-2014 series

  • 8/30: What I did this summer
  • 9/6: Turing on artificial intelligence
  • 9/13: Trusting trust
  • 9/20: Pair programming
  • 9/27: "The story of Mel"
  • 10/4: Software-based legal assistance systems
  • 11/8: The network time protocol
  • 12/6: "Beyond efficiency"
  • 12/13: "The reactive manifesto"
  • 1/24: 3-D printing
  • 1/31: The ACM Code of Ethics
  • 2/7: The classic "P vs. NP" problem
  • 2/21: Skip lists
  • 4/11: Lambda expressions in Java 8
  • 4/18: Privacy in the age of big data and analytics

2012-2013 series

  • 9/7: Radical bricolage
  • 9/14: Generative art
  • 9/21: Computers and creativity
  • 10/5: Aesthetic computimg
  • 10/12: Live coding (performance art)
  • 10/19: Digital pioneers
  • 11/2: Computer art and constructivism
  • 11/9: Early computer artists' writings on computer art
  • 11/16: Programming language for artists
  • 2/1: Women in computing (WIC)
  • 2/15: WIC: Mentors and role models
  • 2/29: WIC: Perceptions of (under)enrollment in CS
  • 4/5: WIC: Women and games
  • 4/12: WIC: "Brogramming"
  • 4/19: WIC: K-12 computer science education
  • 4/26: WIC: Adria Richards incident
  • 5/3: WIC: Recruiting and hiring technical women

Community events

Outside the classroom, several activities help create a sense of community among computing students and faculty.

  • The department organizes picnics in the fall and spring, often held in cooperation with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.
  • Faculty and students get together informally for lunch at noon on Fridays.
  • Most weeks, students and faculty meet for our Thursday Extras lecture series, with refreshments and conversation before a talk by a student, faculty member, or visitor.
AI with Henry Walker
  • The Computer Science Student Educational Policy Committee (CS SEPC), elected by majors, organizes study breaks most weeks — typically Monday evenings starting at 8:00 pm, as well as other events.

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