Thursday Extras

Monday Extra: "Bluetooth communications with Scribbler 2 robots"

On Monday, April 14, Spencer Liberto 2014 and Professor Henry Walker will present a progress report on a project that Mr. Liberto worked on last fall, in collaboration with Dilan Ustek 2013 and Jordan Yuan 2015, under Professor Walker's direction:

Since fall 2011, CSC 161 has utilized Scribbler 2 robots as an application theme, with the software infrastructure based on a C++ package available from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Although the C++ infrastructure has worked well, it is not very portable to other platforms, and this limits the range of institutions that can use the CSC 161 materials developed here. To address this issue, Mr. Walker worked with three students in fall 2013 to begin rewriting the C++ infrastructure in Standard C. This talk will outline the substantial progress made during fall 2013 and propose a subsequent MAP to the complete the Standard C infrastructure during fall 2014.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The presentation, “Bluetooth communications with Scribbler 2 robots: a progress report,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Mobile computing for social good"

On Thursday, January 30, Spencer Liberto 2015 will report on the work of his summer 2013 research team:

Over the course of the summer, a group of students worked with Professor Sam Rebelsky to redesign the CSC 207 curriculum. Our goal was to create a curriculum that was a more natural successor of the first two introductory courses in the sequence, by engaging the students with motivational tools and a core theme they could relate to. We achieved that by building the curriculum around Android development, to provide students with tangible end-of-course projects to call their own, and tying it all together under an overarching theme of social justice.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Mobile computing for social good in CSC 207,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: Summer 2014 research projects

On Thursday, January 23, Professors Sam Rebelsky, Jerod Weinman, and Eliza Kempton will discuss summer student research in computing at Grinnell, describing the projects that our faculty will direct this year. In addition, John Stone will describe the system-administration projects for which he hopes to hire one or two student assistants.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The discussion will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Multiple models of media scripting"

On Thursday, December 12, in Noyce 3821, Marsha Fletcher 2015, Alexandra Greenberg 2016, Mark Lewis 2016, Evan Manuella 2016, and Christine Tran 2016 will present the results of their summer 2013 research internships, directed by Professor Sam Rebelsky.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Multiple models of media scripting,” will begin at 4:30. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Summer experiences in computer science"

On Thursday, November 7, Chike Abuah 2014, Aaltan Ahmad 2014, Nediyana Daskalova 2014, Erik Opavsky 2014, Kim Spasaro 2014, Daniel Torres 2015, and Brennan Wallace 2016 will conduct a panel discussion on summer experiences in computer science. The participants will describe their internship experiences, ranging from start-ups to Apple to research and more.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The panel discussion will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Graduate school in computer science: what? why? how? when? who?"

On Thursday, October 10, Professor Jerod Weinman will discuss what graduate school in computer science is like, why you might consider it, what opportunities there are for graduate education, employment after graduate school, the application process (for computer science or related fields in particular), and other related issues attendees may be interested in.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The panel, Graduate school in computer science: what? why? how? when? who? will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "My Microsoft internship"

On Thursday, September 26, Jennelle Nystrom 2014 will describe her summer work experience. She writes:

In this presentation I will cover my experience working as a Program Manager at Microsoft over the summer. Specifically, I will talk about my experiences coordinating Scrum with a team of developers, and describe how different feature teams work together within the company.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “My Microsoft internship,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Computational linguistics: crawling the Web for non-English data"

On Thursday, September 19, Kim Spasaro 2014 will discuss the construction of an digital collection of written text in a specific language. She writes:

This summer I interned with Carnegie Mellon's Language Technologies Institute. While there, I was part of a project working to enable machine translation for Bantu languages. More specifically, I was responsible for building a corpus of Kinyarwanda phrases to be used for machine learning. At this talk, I will discuss how I used the Apache Nutch web crawler to launch a large-scale web crawl in search of Kinyarwanda data.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Computational linguistics: crawling the Web for non-English data,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Generative art and the computer collaborator"

On Thursday, May 2, Colin Brooks 2013 will speak on “Generative art and the computer collaborator.” Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Building knowledge and confidence with mediascripting"

On Thursday, February 28, Professors Sam Rebelsky, Janet Davis, and Jerod Weinman will discuss the rationale for using media scripting in our introductory computer science course:

Grinnell's CSC 151 draws upon concepts of media computation to motivate students and to provide more visual feedback that helps students better understand the algorithms they write. At the same time, CSC 151 encourages students to think about computing (and image making) in multiple ways. In this talk, a preview of a talk we will give at the SIGCSE Symposium on Computer Science Education, we discuss the inception of the course, what we see as key design points of the course, and the ways in which we have assessed the efficacy of the course. Since the introduction of this new version of 151, we have seen significant increases in enrollment and diversity. Assessments suggest that the course helps students develop deep knowledge that is atypical of an introductory course and also builds confidence.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Building knowledge and confidence with mediascripting: a successful interdisciplinary approach to CS1,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

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