Thursday Extras

Thursday Extra: "Historical map processing"

On Thursday, November 20, Toby Baratta 2017, Bo Wang 2016, and Kitt Nika 2016 will present their summer research on the automatic detection of place names on historical maps:

This past summer we did research on toponym detection and recognition on historical maps. Overall, our research goal was making historical maps more search-friendly and making information in the maps more accessible. Kitt Nika and Shen Zhang worked on detecting text strings on map images with maximally stable extremal regions (MSER). With this, they implemented a binarization method for future research in text detection. Kitt will discuss MSERs and the methods involving them in regards to text detection. Toby Baratta and Bo Wang worked on linking geographic datasets and recognizing toponyms from the detected text strings. With the alignment between historical maps and real-life geography, we used a Bayesian model to calculate probabilities of possible toponyms. Toby and Bo will discuss their work on increasing the range of our recognition system by adding area features such as lakes.

At 4:15 p.m., refreshments will be served in the Computer Science Commons. The talk, “Historical map processing: text detectors, database linking, and region models,” will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Beyond Binary Decision Diagrams"

On Thursday, November 13, Professor Gianfranco Ciardo, Professor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University, will speak on extensions of binary decision diagrams:

Binary decision diagrams (BDDs) have had enormous success since Bryant showed how to use them for the efficient verification of boolean hardware designs and Clarke and McMillan employed for symbolic model checking. In this talk, we take BDDs as a starting point and explore various extension of decision diagrams, we apply them to problems beyond temporal logic verification, and we discuss several challenging research problems related to decision diagrams.

Before the talk, Professor Ciardo will meet informally with students considering the possibility of graduate study at Iowa State. This meeting will be in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817), beginning at 3:45 p.m.

At 4:15 p.m., refreshments will be served in the Computer Science Commons. Professor Ciardo's talk, “Beyond BDDs: advanced decision diagrams and their applications,” will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Off-campus study and computer science"

On Thursday, November 6, Professor Janet Davis and Richard Bright, Director of Off-Campus Study, will lead a discussion of options for combining off-campus study with study of computer science. CS majors who have studied abroad are welcome to come share their experiences.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The presentation, “Off-campus study and computer science,” will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Toss a coin, throw a ball, and solve a problem"

On Thursday, October 30, Professor Sriram Pemmarju of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Iowa will discuss the uses of randomness in algorithm design:

Randomness has proven itself to be an amazingly useful resource in the design of simple and efficient algorithms. Randomized algorithms are now widespread in all areas of computer science; examples can be found in cryptography, data compression, distributed systems, machine learning, network protocols, online and streaming algorithms, etc. This talk will present a few “gems” of randomization—algorithms that highlight the elegance and power of randomized techniques, while identifying underlying principles that guide the design of randomized algorithms. Time permitting, the talk will also consider the theoretical question of whether randomness provably adds to the power of efficient algorithms.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). Professor Pemmarju's talk, “Toss a coin, throw a ball,and solve a problem,” will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Graduate School in Computer Science"

On Thursday, October 16, Professors Janet Davis and Jerod Weinman will discuss what graduate school in computer science is like, why you might consider it, what opportunities there are for graduate education, employment after graduate school, applying (for computer science or related fields in particular), and other related issues attendees may be interested in.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the computer science commons (Noyce 3817), with the presentation and discussion to follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. All are welcome to attend.

Thursday Extra: "Careers on Rails"

On Thursday, October 2, Wes Beary 2005, Alex Leach 2006, Cassie Schmitz 2005, and Ian Young 2008 will discuss Web development and infrastructure using the Ruby on Rails Web application framework and “agile development” methods. In this panel, they will describe their career paths and answer questions about their work developing software as a service.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The panel discussion, “Careers on Rails: Grinnell CS Alumni in Web Development and Infrastructure” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extras: Résumé Review Session

What: Résumé Review Session
When: 4:30 p.m., Thursday, 18 September 2014
Where: Science 3821
Who: SEPC, StuACM, CLS Staff, Alumni

Snacks, drinks, and casual conversation will be available in the CS Commons at 4:15 p.m.

On Thursday, 18 September 2014, the Computer Science Department's Student Educational Policy Committee (SEPC) and the Grinnell College Student Chapter of the ACM will present a Résumé Review Session. CLS staff and CS alumni will be present to review résumés, discuss general approaches to résumé building for computer scientists, and provide useful ideas.

Bring your résumé, whether you think it's complete or a work in progress. If you haven't started your résumé yet, this is incentive to do so. And, even if you don't have a résumé ready by the session, come and hear about the kinds of things people look at when reading résumés.

Thursday Extra: "Sudo Open Sesame"

On Thursday, September 11, Ajuna Kyaruzi 2017 will describe her experiences as an assistant system administrator for MathLAN last summer.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Sudo Open Sesame: My Summer as an Assistant GNU/Linux System Administrator,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: Augmenting reality with Kindle and iPhone

On Thursday, April 17, Charlie Eddy 2016 will present a talk describing his recent work in reality augmentation using the Kindle and the iPhone.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The presentation will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Monday Extra: "Bluetooth communications with Scribbler 2 robots"

On Monday, April 14, Spencer Liberto 2014 and Professor Henry Walker will present a progress report on a project that Mr. Liberto worked on last fall, in collaboration with Dilan Ustek 2013 and Jordan Yuan 2015, under Professor Walker's direction:

Since fall 2011, CSC 161 has utilized Scribbler 2 robots as an application theme, with the software infrastructure based on a C++ package available from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Although the C++ infrastructure has worked well, it is not very portable to other platforms, and this limits the range of institutions that can use the CSC 161 materials developed here. To address this issue, Mr. Walker worked with three students in fall 2013 to begin rewriting the C++ infrastructure in Standard C. This talk will outline the substantial progress made during fall 2013 and propose a subsequent MAP to the complete the Standard C infrastructure during fall 2014.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The presentation, “Bluetooth communications with Scribbler 2 robots: a progress report,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

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