CS Table

Women in computing / Computer Science Table: Recruiting and hiring technical women

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss efforts to recruit and hire technical women. We will consider a variety of resources related to this issue.

First, two popular press articles on Etsy's efforts to build its staff of women technologists:

Second, an article on “affirmative effort”:

Finally, we will consider a series of short approaches from the National Center for Women in Technology's “Pacesetters” program:

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Computer Science Table / Women in computing: "Adria Richards"

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss the recent Adria Richards fiasco. If you don't know about it, any of the readings below will give you a quick overview.

Our primary reading is

This reading includes a number of forum comments. You should take the time to read some of them. Since the case involves the way people behave publicly and using online communication tools, forum comments are particularly relevant.

This reading also includes a number of links which you may find it useful to follow.

Other relevant articles:

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Computer Science Table / Women in computing: "K-12 CS Ed"

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss elementary and secondary education in computer science. The readings are

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

CS Table / Women in computing: "Brogramming"

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss “brogramming.” The readings are

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Computer Science Table: "Women and games"

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss issues relating to women and video games. The readings are

  • Brown, Janelle. “Girl gamers: sugar, spice, everything profitable?” Wired, November 19, 1996.
  • Williams, Dmitri, Nicole Martins, Mia Consalvo, and James D. Ivory. “The virtual census: representations of gender, race and age in video games.” New media & society, 2009.
  • Jenson, Jennifer, and Suzanne de Castell. “Gender, simulation, and gaming: research review and redirections.” Simulation & gaming, 2010.

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Women in computing / Computer Science Table: "Perceptions of (under)enrollment in computer science"

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss perceptions of the underrepresentation of women in computer science. The readings are

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Women in Computing / Computer Science Table: "People who make a difference"

The reading for this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table is

Gloria Childress Townsend. 2002. People who make a difference: mentors and role models. SIGCSE Bull. 34, 2 (June 2002), 57-61. DOI=10.1145/543812.543831

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Computer Science Table: "Women and computing"

This semester, the focus of CS Table is “Women and computing.” We will read and discuss a wide variety of articles that explore issues of gender in computing, particularly the underrepresentation of women in computing. Students may choose to register for CS Table as a one-credit special-topics course. Students should also feel free to attend discussions without registering.

At this Friday's CS Table, we will consider three articles by Maria Klawe that explore the changing status of women in computer science. The articles span nearly fifteen years, giving us a chance to look at how things change and how things stayed the same.

  • Maria Klawe and Nancy Leveson. 1995. Women in computing: where are we now? Commun. ACM 38, 1 (January 1995), 29-35. DOI=10.1145/204865.204874
  • Maria Klawe. 2002. Girls, boys, and computers. SIGCSE Bull. 34, 2 (June 2002), 16-17. DOI=10.1145/543812.543818
  • Maria Klawe, Telle Whitney, and Caroline Simard. 2009. Women in computing---take 2. Commun. ACM 52, 2 (February 2009), 68-76. DOI=10.1145/1461928.1461947

Copies of the reading are available online using the DOI links. Printed copies should be available outside Professor Rebelsky's office (Noyce 3824).

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: A programming language for artists

This Friday at Algorithmic Arts (+ CS Table), we will consider some portions of John Maeda's book Design by numbers, which provides a simple programming language for artists.

Meada, John (1999). Design by numbers. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

The sections include the preface and introduction, a chapter on repetition, and two chapters on dots. There are also a number of images from the book.

For folks who haven't been to CS table lately, this reading gives us some opportunity to talk about language design issues as well as artistic issues.

Copies of the readings are available outside Professor Rebelsky's office. Kate and Tolu will lead our discussion and have asked participants to consider the following questions:

  • How might you create the images from the book (not the ones with the accompanying code)?
  • What's the smallest set of functions you would need to make these images?

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: Early computer artists' writings on computer art

At this Friday's CS Table/Algorithmic Arts session (at noon in Rosenfield 224A) we will consider some writings by a variety of early practitioners of computer art, published as the art was actually being produced. These articles are taken from

Rosen, Margit, Ed. (2011). A little-known story about a movement, a magazine, and the computer's arrival in art: new tendencies and Bit international, 1961-1973.

The particular readings are
  • Franke, Herbert W. (orig. 1971, translation 2011). Social aspects of computer art (pp. 435-437).
  • Morellet, Francois (orig. 1962, translation 2011). The case for programmed experimental painting (pp. 92-93).
  • Munari, Bruno (orig. 1964, reprinted 2011). Arte programmata (p. 176).
  • Nake, Frieder (orig. 1968). There should be no computer art (pp. 466-467).
  • Nees, Georg (orig. 1968, translation 2011). Computer graphics and visual translations (pp. 320-325).

Copies of the readings are available outside Professor Rebelsky's office (Noyce 3824). Please complete the reading in advance so that our discussion is productive. Colin and Sinan will lead our discussion.

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