faculty

Job Openings in CS at Grinnell College

Grinnell College is hiring for several visiting positions in Computer Science.

Why visit in CS at Grinnell?

We think Grinnell is an excellent place to be if you are passionate about both teaching and scholarship and want to make a difference in the lives of young adults. Here are some of the things that set us apart.

You can also read more about our open visiting positions and some recent questions and answers about those positions.

Teaching CS

At first glance, undergraduate curricula and departments may seem similar. Everyone teaches some kind of data structures and algorithms courses. Everyone has some required systems courses. Most require an upper-level theory of computation course. In those ways, Grinnell is much like other departments. But some characteristics of the curriculum and the College make us special.

  • An internationally recognized curriculum. Grinnell is one of only five curricular exemplars in the Joint ACM/IEEE Computer Science Curricula 2013.
  • A multi-paradigm introductory sequence. We believe students learn CS best when they are exposed to a broad variety of approaches. We emphasize functional programming in the first course, imperative in the second, and object-oriented in the third. As you might expect, each class develops student skills in algorithmic thinking. Each class also focuses on a particular problem domain. This year, the first course considers data science and the second course uses some robotics.
  • An emphasis on active learning. We've been teaching with a type of "flipped classroom" for more than two decades. Particularly for the introductory sequence, our model is that students do a bit of reading before class and spend most of class time working on problems with other students.
  • Strong support for innovative teaching across the College. Grinnell is a place in which colleagues will encourage you to try new approaches to your teaching and the College will help support such innovation. Grinnell also encourages faculty to learn from each other with a variety of resources, including a regular Science Teaching and Learning Group and week-long summer workshops on a wide variety of topics.
  • An individually-mentored curriculum. Grinnell has no required general education courses, other than a first-year seminar. Rather, advisers help students figure out what classes will be best for them. As a teacher, you'll find that the students in your classes are there because they want to learn the material, not because they are checking off a requirement.

Diversity and Inclusion

The department also has a strong commitment to diversifying the discipline, which is reflected not only in the issues discussed above, but also in a number of other departmental initiatives. Many efforts focus on developing a sense of community in the department, including peer mentoring programs, weekly lunchtime discussion groups, and evening study breaks. Our efforts have been successful. For example, over 30% of our majors are women, at least twice the national average.

This fall, the department and the College provided financial support for 9 students attending the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, 13 of 20 students attending the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing, and 8 students attending MINK WIC (Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, & Kansas Women in Computing Conference).

The CS department is also active in institution-wide diversity efforts, such as the Grinnell Science Project (GSP), which has been honored with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring for more than twenty years of successful efforts to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups who earn degrees in the sciences. Two members of the department have served as leaders of GSP in recent years. We are also active in the the Liberal Arts Colleges Association for Faculty Inclusion (LACAFI), an organization co-founded by Grinnell that aims to assist in the recruitment and appointment of faculty committed to diversity in the sciences. We particularly hope that candidates who share our commitment to diversity will apply.

Scholarship

Grinnell, like most comparable institutions, expects that its faculty are strong teachers and strong scholars. And like most comparable institutions, we provide funds to support those scholarly endeavors. But a few things set Grinnell apart.

  • A rich culture of student-faculty research. Grinnell's student-faculty research fund regularly allows interested faculty to work with students each summer while compensating those students with course credit and a stipend. Funds are usually available for four students per faculty member, and faculty receive a modest stipend as well. Our students regularly present their work at regional, national, and international peer-reviewed conferences.
  • Broader connections. Grinnell is one of twelve liberal arts colleges that belong to the Computing Research Association (CRA).

Our statement on expectations for scholarship may give you a sense of how we think broadly about scholarship in the discipline.

Synthesizing Teaching and Scholarship

While many people separate teaching and scholarship, we often find ways to integrate the two. Many of us have student co-authors on research papers (typically as an outcome of summer research projects). We also leave room in the curriculum for courses that tie closely to our areas of research, such as computer vision and evolutionary biology. In addition, several faculty members in the department contribute to the scholarly literature in computer science education.

Helping Early Career Faculty Succeed

We work hard to hire faculty we think will do well at Grinnell. We work as hard to make sure those faculty will succeed. In addition to the support for teaching and scholarship mentioned above, Grinnell provides a wide variety of resources, from opportunities for mentoring to an active early career faculty group that provides both social and professional support for such faculty.

A Bit More About Grinnell

Grinnell is a highly-selective liberal arts college, ranked in the top-twenty in the US News and World Report analysis (#19 this year). Grinnell has a well-deserved reputation for undergraduate teaching. A recent NSF report ranks Grinnell 7th per capita among schools from which science and engineering Ph.D.'s received their bachelors degrees.

Grinnell has a strong commitment to social justice, revealed, in part, by our need-blind admissions process. We do not consider ability to pay in making admissions decisions, and we meet the full demonstrated financial need (at least according to government calculations) of students we accept. 87% of our students receive financial aid, with an average financial aid package of over $45,000 to students demonstrating need. In an era in which student debt is a mounting problem, Grinnell students in the class of 2015 graduated with an average debt of only $16,000.

Our commitment to social justice and our admissions process lead to a diverse student body. The class of 2020 includes approximately 25% international students, 15% first generation college students, and 25% domestic students of color.

Because our students are active participants in their choice of courses, most also successfully integrate a broad variety of interests, taking ideas and approaches from one course to another, from outside their coursework into their coursework, or from their coursework to the broader community. Many prospective faculty are attracted to Grinnell by the quality of our students.

Q&A for Visiting Positions to Start Fall 2018

These are some of the questions we've received about the position, along with our answers. (The answers are mostly from Professor Samuel Rebelsky.) We have posted them with the expectation that they will also be useful to others. Feel free to send additional questions to CSSearch@grinnell.edu.

Will you consider candidates who do not have a Ph.D.?

Yes! Candidates who are knowledgeable in the computing discipline and show evidence of promise for effective teaching are welcome to apply. Our department has had tremendously positive experiences in the past with visiting faculty that did not hold a Ph.D.

Will you consider candidates who do not have a CS degree?

Yes! We think broadly about the discipline of computing. In addition to CS, our faculty hold PhD.s in mathematics, philosophy, and evolutionary biology. While it is important that candidates be sufficiently knowledgeable about the discipline to teach a variety of courses in our curriculum, we welcome candidates that possess a degree outside computing (related fields preferred) as well as relevant computing knowledge and experience.

What courses will the new hire teach?

Grinnell's normal teaching load is five courses over two semesters. Given our long history as a smaller department, several regular faculty have taught many courses in the curriculum. Therefore, we will do our best to allow visitors to teach the courses in our curriculum they feel best-suited to teach. We are a collegial department and try to work out schedules that balance interests and workload each year. For the several courses in which multiple sections are offered, we can pair visiting faculty with an experienced faculty member teaching another section of that course. Depending on staffing and enrollments, there may also be an opportunity for visitors to offer an elective course for the major in the area of their interest.

How many students are there in CS courses?

We cap our introductory courses at 32 and 28, our mid-level courses at 24, and our upper-level courses at 20. Current demand means that most courses enroll to capacity. We currently graduate around 50 CS majors each year.

What are Grinnell College students like?

Hmmm ... that's an interesting question. By and large, we find Grinnell students a joy to teach. Most of them are taking classes because they want to learn, not because they have to or because they need to check off a box in order to graduate. Almost all of them have multipale interests. We see CS majors doing improv, playing in ensembles and bands, competing on the athletic fields, and more.

Is there financial support for faculty scholarship?

Visiting faculty members receive an annual budget of $2,000 to cover attendance at a professional meeting (e.g., registration, travel, lodging, and meals) and up to $500 for other research expenses. Stipends for summer research students are covered out of a separate budget, as are supplies for those students and a stipend for supervising those students. Other resources are also available on a case-by-case basis.

Is there interdisciplinary work at Grinnell that could involve computer science?

In general, yes. Faculty in many disciplines use computing as part of their work. Some likely collaborations would like be with our biology faculty who are interested in bioinformatics, our computational chemists, English faculty working in the digital humanities, faculty working on the cross-disciplinary data science program, and some of our arts faculty. But others are certainly possible. In the end, it depends on two faculty finding common interests.

What do Grinnell students do after graduation?

Our computer science majors generally go on to do the typical variety of things that CS majors do. Some end up at well-known companies (Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Apple, Facebook). Some end up at startups. A few go on to graduate school immediately after college. Some end up in the financial industry. Some head off to volunteer opportunities (e.g., Teach for America or Lutheran Volunteer Corps.) Over the longer term, some bring their general thinking skills to other areas. We count physicians, professional comedians, fundraisers, and helicopter pilots among our CS alumni.

Why so many visiting positions?

Two faculty members will be on leave during the next two years, so two of the positions constitute leave replacements. The third represents a needed expansion in teaching capacity to meet demand.

Do you expect to hire any tenure-track positions soon?

We plan to apply for tenure-track expansions in the coming year. The governing body of the College decides how available tenure-track lines are allocated.

What is it like living in Grinnell, Iowa?

I should probably let the younger faculty respond to this. Grinnell is a small town, with about 8500 residents (plus about 1600 Grinnell College students). It's affordable. Many faculty live within walking distance of the College. (I think all but one of the CS faculty are within a five-block radius of the College; the other lives about a mile away.) Some faculty choose to live in Iowa City or Des Moines, each of which is about an hour away. Our schools are decent, and the community provides a lot of interesting extracurricular activities. Several faculty in the department all note that we find this a great place to raise our children.

Q&A for Visiting Positions to Start Fall 2018

These are some of the questions we've received about the position, along with our answers. (The answers are mostly from Professor Samuel Rebelsky.) We have posted them with the expectation that they will also be useful to others. Feel free to send additional questions to CSSearch@grinnell.edu.

Will you consider candidates who do not have a Ph.D.?

Yes! Candidates who are knowledgeable in the computing discipline and show evidence of promise for effective teaching are welcome to apply. Our department has had tremendously positive experiences in the past with visiting faculty that did not hold a Ph.D.

Will you consider candidates who do not have a CS degree?

Yes! We think broadly about the discipline of computing. In addition to CS, our faculty hold PhD.s in mathematics, philosophy, and evolutionary biology. While it is important that candidates be sufficiently knowledgeable about the discipline to teach a variety of courses in our curriculum, we welcome candidates that possess a degree outside computing (related fields preferred) as well as relevant computing knowledge and experience.

What courses will the new hire teach?

Grinnell's normal teaching load is five courses over two semesters. Given our long history as a smaller department, several regular faculty have taught many courses in the curriculum. Therefore, we will do our best to allow visitors to teach the courses in our curriculum they feel best-suited to teach. We are a collegial department and try to work out schedules that balance interests and workload each year. For the several courses in which multiple sections are offered, we can pair visiting faculty with an experienced faculty member teaching another section of that course. Depending on staffing and enrollments, there may also be an opportunity for visitors to offer an elective course for the major in the area of their interest.

How many students are there in CS courses?

We cap our introductory courses at 32 and 28, our mid-level courses at 24, and our upper-level courses at 20. Current demand means that most courses enroll to capacity.

What are Grinnell College students like?

Hmmm ... that's an interesting question. By and large, we find Grinnell students a joy to teach. Most of them are taking classes because they want to learn, not because they have to or because they need to check off a box in order to graduate. Almost all of them have multipale interests. We see CS majors doing improv, playing in ensembles and bands, competing on the athletic fields, and more.

Is there financial support for faculty scholarship?

Visiting faculty members receive an annual budget of $2,000 to cover attendance at a professional meeting (e.g., registration, travel, lodging, and meals) and up to $500 for other research expenses. Stipends for summer research students are covered out of a separate budget, as are supplies for those students. Other resources are also available on a case-by-case basis.

Is there interdisciplinary work at Grinnell that could involve computer science?

In general, yes. Faculty in many disciplines use computing as part of their work. Some likely collaborations would like be with our biology faculty who are interested in bioinformatics, our computational chemists, English faculty working in the digital humanities, faculty working on the cross-disciplinary data science program, and some of our arts faculty. But others are certainly possible. In the end, it depends on two faculty finding common interests.

What do Grinnell students do after graduation?

Our computer science majors generally go on to do the typical variety of things that CS majors do. Some end up at well-known companies (Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Apple, Facebook). Some end up at startups. A few go on to graduate school immediately after college. Some end up in the financial industry. Some head off to volunteer opportunities (e.g., Teach for America or Lutheran Volunteer Corps.) Over the longer term, some bring their general thinking skills to other areas. We count physicians, professional comedians, fundraisers, and helicopter pilots among our CS alumni.

Do you expect to hire any tenure-track positions soon?

We plan to apply for tenure-track expansions in the coming year. The governing body of the College decides how available tenure-track lines are allocated.

What is it like living in Grinnell, Iowa?

I should probably let the younger faculty respond to this. Grinnell is a small town, with about 8500 residents (plus about 1600 Grinnell College students). It's affordable. Many faculty live within walking distance of the College. (I think all but one of the CS faculty are within a five-block radius of the College; the other lives about a mile away.) Some faculty choose to live in Iowa City or Des Moines, each of which is about an hour away. Our schools are decent, and the community provides a lot of interesting extracurricular activities. Several faculty in the department all note that we find this a great place to raise our children.

Three Multi-Year Visiting Positions (Start Fall 2018)

GRINNELL COLLEGE – COMPUTER SCIENCE – THREE MULTI-YEAR TERM POSITIONS (START FALL 2018).

GRINNELL COLLEGE. The Department of Computer Science invites applications for two three-year term positions and one two-year term position beginning Fall 2018. Ph.D. in Computer Science preferred, but candidates with degrees (e.g., Ed.D., ABD ,or Master’s) in closely related fields and relevant experience will be considered. Research and teaching interests might include, but are not limited to: theory, algorithms, systems, AI, HCI, software engineering, programming languages, CS education, data science, security, databases, graphics, parallel and distributed computing, accessibility technology, or social and ethical issues in computing. See http://www.cs.grinnell.edu.

Grinnell College is a highly selective undergraduate liberal arts college with a strong tradition of social responsibility. In letters of application, candidates should discuss their potential to contribute to a college community that maintains a diversity of people and perspectives as one of its core values. To be assured of full consideration, all application materials should be received by February 1. Please visit our application website at https://jobs.grinnell.edu to find more details about the job and submit applications online. Candidates will need to upload a letter of application, curriculum vitae, transcripts (copies are acceptable), a description of scholarly activities, and a teaching statement that includes a description of the ways they plan to support diversity in the department, College, and the discipline. Candidates must also provide email addresses for three references. Questions about this search should be directed to the search chair, Professor Jerod Weinman, at CSSearch@grinnell.edu or 641-269-3169.

Grinnell College is committed to establishing and maintaining a safe and nondiscriminatory educational environment for all College community members. It is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination in matters of admission, employment, and housing, and in access to and participation in its education programs, services, and activities. The college does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, veteran status, pregnancy, childbirth, religion, disability, creed, or any other protected class.

An offer for this position will be contingent on successful completion of a background check.

Tenure-Track Position, Starting Fall 2017

GRINNELL COLLEGE – COMPUTER SCIENCE (AREA OPEN) - TENURE-TRACK POSITION (START FALL 2017).

GRINNELL COLLEGE. The Department of Computer Science invites applications for a tenure-track appointment beginning Fall 2017. Assistant Professor (Ph.D.) preferred; Instructor (ABD) or Associate Professor possible. Research and teaching interests might include, but are not limited to, theory, algorithms, systems, AI, HCI, software engineering, programming languages, CS education, data science, security, databases, graphics, parallel and distributed computing, accessibility technology, or social and ethical issues in computing.

Grinnell College is a highly selective undergraduate liberal arts college with a strong tradition of social responsibility. In letters of application, candidates should discuss their potential to contribute to a college community that maintains a diversity of people and perspectives as one of its core values. Review of applications will begin on October 21, 2016. Please visit our department website at http://www.cs.grinnell.edu and our application website at https://jobs.grinnell.edu/postings/1691 to find more details about the job and submit applications online. Candidates will need to upload a letter of application, curriculum vitae, transcripts (copies are acceptable), a teaching statement, a description of scholarly activities, and a statement about ways in which they can support diversity in the department, the College, and the discipline. Candidates must also provide email addresses for three references. Questions about this search should be directed to the search chair, Professor Samuel A. Rebelsky, at [CSSearch@grinnell.edu] or 641-269-3169.

Grinnell College is committed to providing a safe and inclusive educational and work environment for all College community members, and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, veteran status, religion, disability, creed, or any other protected class.

Further information is available at http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/prospective-faculty/overview.

Computer Science Department Activities, Projects, and Responsibilities (2016-17)

The computer science faculty actively engage in activities and projects within Grinnell College, the Science Division, the department, and other areas. This page serves as a reference and contact list for many of these activities. Since all faculty are actively engaged in teaching, this page does not include specific activities related to classes, course development, or other aspects of teaching.
  • Contact the relevant faculty member if you have questions or comments regarding any of these activities.
  • Contact the department chair if you have questions about the department, organizational matters, or other areas not covered in this listing.
College Level Science Division Level Department Level Special Tasks Previous Versions

Computer Science Department Activities, Projects, and Responsibilities (2015-16)

The computer science faculty actively engage in activities and projects within Grinnell College, the Science Division, the department, and other areas. This page serves as a reference and contact list for many of these activities. Since all faculty are actively engaged in teaching, this page does not include specific activities related to classes, course development, or other aspects of teaching.

  • Contact the relevant faculty member if you have questions or comments regarding any of these activities.
  • Contact the department chair if you have questions about the department, organizational matters, or other areas not covered in this listing.

College Level

Science Division Level

Department Level

  • Department Chair: Samuel A. Rebelsky
    • Supervision of departmental assistant(s) and ASAs
    • Development of faculty-staff teaching assignment
    • Creation of class schedules
    • Supervision of graduation breakfast (with Science Secretaries)
    • Faculty recruiting
    • Promotion, tenure, contract renewal reviews
    • Merit reviews
    • Regular meetings with Student Educational Policy Committee (SEPC)
    • Paperwork from Dean's office
    • Faculty mentoring
    • College catalog entry
    • Review transfer credit requests
    • Budget
  • AIT Program in Budapest: TBD
    • Coordinate with Budapest program
    • Advise students on courses
  • Assessment Coordinator: Peter-Michael Osera
    • Reminders regarding exit interviews
    • Identification, posting of learning outcomes
    • Coordination with the College's Office of Analytic Support and Institutional Research (OASIR) and Center for Teaching Learning and Assessment (CTLA)
  • Communications Liaison: John David Stone, Henry M. Walker
  • Computer Science Museum: Henry M. Walker
  • Computer Science Commons: ASA
    • Make sure there's water in the coffee pot.
    • Straighten.
    • Contact SEPC when the dishes are not being washed.
  • Computer Science Table: Peter-Michael Osera and Charlie Curtsinger
    • Pick readings
    • Advertise (coordinate with ASA)
    • Lead discussions
  • Diversity Initiatives:
    • Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing: Samuel A. Rebelsky, many faculty contribute
    • Richard Tapia Celebration of of Diversity in Computing: Samuel A. Rebelsky, many faculty contribute
  • Picnic (coordinated with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics): Jerod Weinman
  • Placement of Incoming Students: Samuel Rebelsky, Henry M. Walker
  • Pledge of the Computing Professional: John David Stone
  • Senior Lunch and Awards: Samuel Rebelsky
  • Social Media Liaisons: varies according to activity
  • Study Abroad in CS: TBD
    • Maintain list of study-abroad programs relevant to CS
    • Maintain list of course equivalents in those programs
    • Advise students on study-abroad options
    • Coordinate with Off-campus Study office
  • Supervision of Peer Educators (Mentors, Lab Assistants, Tutors): Jerod Weinman (Fall), TBD (Spring)
    • Train mentors, lab assistants, individual tutors
    • Prepare lists of responsibilities for peer educators
    • Prepare picture list of peer educators
    • Recruit students for peer-educator positions
    • Interview prospective peer educators
    • Work with faculty to assign peer mentors to classes
    • Prepare schedule of evening tutors
    • Assign individual and small-group tutors to students
    • Read and respond to reports from individual tutors, evening tutors, and mentor sessions
    • Gather data on usage of peer educators
  • Thursday Extras John David Stone
  • Web Site: John David Stone leads, all CS faculty contribute

Special Tasks

Previous Versions

Tenure Track Position, Starting Fall 2015

The department is looking for a new faculty member who shares our passions for teaching, scholarship, and mentoring students. Further information can be found at http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/prospective-faculty/tenure-track-2014-ad and http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/prospective-faculty/overview. Materials should be submitted by November 8, 2014.

Tenure-Track Position, Starting Fall 2015

The Computer Science Department will be hiring a new tenure-track faculty member to start in Fall 2015. The official job posting appears below. If you explore our department, you'll find that Grinnell's CS department is an energetic and exciting place where we balance and connect our teaching and scholarship.

If you have questions about the position, please send them to CSSearch@grinnell.edu. You may also want to look at recent questions and answers.

GRINNELL COLLEGE – DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE (AREA OPEN) – TENURE-TRACK POSITION (START FALL 2015)

GRINNELL COLLEGE. Tenure-track position in the Department of Computer Science, starting Fall 2015. Assistant Professor (Ph.D.) preferred; Instructor (ABD) or Associate Professor possible. Area open; possibilities include, but are not limited to, systems, theory, algorithms, AI, HCI, software engineering, programming languages, CS education, data science, databases, graphics, parallel and distributed computing, or social and ethical issues in computing. Grinnell College is a highly selective undergraduate liberal arts college. The College's curriculum is founded on a strong advising system and close student-faculty interaction, with few college-wide requirements beyond the completion of a major. The department of computer science prides itself on an innovative, internationally recognized curriculum that includes a multi-paradigm introductory sequence, encourages faculty-student research, and emphasizes workshop-style learning. Further information is available at: http://www.cs.grinnell.edu. The teaching schedule of five courses over two semesters will include introductory, mid-level, and advanced courses; every few years one course will be Tutorial (a writing/critical thinking course for first-year students, oriented toward a special topic of the instructor's choice).

In letters of application, candidates should discuss their interest in developing as a teacher and scholar in an undergraduate liberal arts college that emphasizes close student-faculty interaction. They should also discuss how they might contribute to a college community that has diversity—of people, personal and educational experiences, and disciplinary perspectives—as one of its core values. To be assured of full consideration, all application materials should be received by November 8, 2014.

Please submit applications online by visiting our application website at https://jobs.grinnell.edu. Candidates will need to upload a letter of application, curriculum vitae, transcripts (copies are acceptable), a teaching statement, and a description of scholarly activities, and provide email addresses for three references. Questions about this search should be directed to the search chair, Professor Samuel A. Rebelsky, at [CSSearch@grinnell.edu] or 641-269-3169.

Grinnell College is committed to establishing and maintaining a safe and nondiscriminatory educational environment for all College community members. It is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination in matters of admission, employment, and housing, and in access to and participation in its education programs, services, and activities. The College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, veteran status, religion, physical or mental disability, creed, or any other protected class.

Computer Science Department Activities, Projects, and Responsiblities (2013-14)

This archival page has been superseded by a more recent list of tasks and responsibilities.

The computer science faculty actively engage in activities and projects within Grinnell College, the Science Division, the department, and other areas. This page serves as a reference and contact list for many of these activities. Since all faculty are actively engaged in teaching, this page does not include specific activities related to classes, course development, or other aspects of teaching.

  • Contact the relevant faculty member if you have questions or comments regarding any of these activities.
  • Contact the department chair if you have questions about the department, organizational matters, or other areas not covered in this listing.

College Level

Science Division Level

Department Level

  • Department Chair: Henry M. Walker
    • Supervision of departmental assistant(s)
    • Development of faculty-staff teaching assignment
    • Creation of class schedules
    • Supervision of graduation breakfast (with Science Secretaries)
    • Promotion, tenure, contract renewal reviews
    • Merit reviews
  • CS Assessment Coordination: Henry M. Walker
    • Reminders regarding exit interviews
    • Identification, posting of learning outcomes
    • Coordination with the College's Office of Analytic Support and Institutional Research (OASIR)
  • Department Web Site: John David Stone leads, all CS faculty contribute
  • Communications Liaison: John David Stone, Henry M. Walker
  • Computer Science Museum: Henry M. Walker
  • Computer Science Table: Samuel Rebelsky
  • Diversity Initiatives:
    • Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing: Janet Davis
    • Richard Tapia Celebration of of Diversity in Computing: shared interest
  • Picnic (coordinated with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics): Jerod Weinman
  • Placement of Incoming Students: Samuel Rebelsky, Henry M. Walker
  • Pledge of Computing Professionals: Janet Davis
  • Senior Lunch and Awards: Samuel Rebelsky
  • Social Media Liaisons: varies according to activity
  • Study Abroad in Budapest: Janet Davis
  • Supervision of Mentors, Lab Assistants Jerod Weinman
  • Thursday Extras: John David Stone
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