computer science education

CS Table on 11/22: CS Education Intitiatives

This CS Table will focus on two computer science education initiatives: CS Unplugged and code.org. These are interesting new approaches to getting computer science education into high school and grade school with some interesting goals. We'll start with a CS Unplugged exercise before the discussion!

There are three short readings suggested for the discussion on November 22:

Computer science table (CS Table) is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Tuesdays from 12:00-1:00pm in JRC 224B. Contact the CS faculty for the weekly reading. Students on meal plans, faculty, and staff are expected to cover the cost of their meals. Visitors to the College and students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

SIGCSE Resources

A variety of resources created by Grinnell CS faculty and students in support of SIGCSE.

Computer Science Table / Women in computing: "K-12 CS Ed"

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss elementary and secondary education in computer science. The readings are

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Thursday Extra: "Grinnell's competitive advantages in computer science"

On Thursday, April 11, Professor Henry Walker will describe the distinctive features of Grinnell's program in computer science:

Prospective students often ask why they should come to Grinnell to study computer science. Seniors and graduates ask what they can or should say to employers or graduate schools regarding how Grinnell's CS program is distinctive. This talk is designed to answer such questions by reviewing several characteristics of Grinnell's CS program:

  • The advantages of B.A. degrees in computer science over more technical degrees
  • Our introductory CS courses as “exemplars” in national curricular recommendations
  • Comparing Grinnell's core CS courses with national recommendations
  • The success rates in Grinnell's CS courses (by measures defined by national standards)
  • The contribution of the activities of Grinnell's CS faculty to Grinnell's success
  • How student-faculty interactions in CS lead to regional and national visibility
  • Grinnell's track record in CS for graduate school, internships, careers in business/industry, etc.

Overall, this talk will highlight numerious ways in which Grinnell's CS program enjoys substantial success by many objective measures.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Grinnell's competitive advantages in computer science,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Women in computing / Computer Science Table: "Perceptions of (under)enrollment in computer science"

At this Friday's session of Women in Computing / CS Table, we'll discuss perceptions of the underrepresentation of women in computer science. The readings are

Computer Science Table is a weekly meeting of Grinnell College community members (students, faculty, staff, etc.) interested in discussing topics related to computing and computer science. CS Table meets Fridays at noon in the Day PDR (the first PDR at the top of the stairs in the Marketplace/Cafeteria, also known as Rosenfield 224A). Faculty, staff, and students on meal plans are expected to pay the cost of their meals. Students not on meal plans can charge their meals to the department.

Thursday Extra: An online community for peer-supported learning of computer science

On Thursday, September 8, Terian Koscik 2012 will give a talk in the "Thursday Extra" series:

For many children, computer science is seen as mysterious, difficult and inaccessible. Even for those who want to study computer science, there are very few resources for learning available until college. Without a program that kids can use to learn on their own, all but the most privileged are prevented from getting started on computer science before they are scared away. The goal of the Looking Glass IDE is to provide a fun, self-directed environment for 8-16 year olds without access to formal computer science classes to learn basic programming concepts by creating movies and games. This summer, I helped to design and implement an online community for users of Looking Glass to share projects, collaborate, compete, and support one another's programming efforts.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). Ms. Koscik's talk, "An online community for peer-supported learning of computer science," will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!
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