Thursday Extra

Thursday Extra: "Summer Opportunities in Computer Science"

On Thursday, December 4, in Noyce 3821, Professor Samuel A. Rebelsky and the other faculty of the Department of Computer Science will present the department's annual discussion of summer opportunities in CS:

It may be hard to believe given the forthcoming sub-freezing temperatures, but it's about time to starting thinking about what you're going to do this coming summer (and maybe even in subsequent summers). If you enjoy computer science (or at least computer programming), summer is an opportunity to explore new approaches, to develop new skills, and perhaps even to make some money. But what kinds of things can you do? While students tend to focus on a few options (e.g., research with faculty), a wide variety of opportunities are available. In this session, we will discuss goals you might set for the summer and some opportunities that can help you achieve those goals.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). Professor Rebelsky's talk, Summer opportunities in computer science, will begin at 4:30. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Historical map processing"

On Thursday, November 20, Toby Baratta 2017, Bo Wang 2016, and Kitt Nika 2016 will present their summer research on the automatic detection of place names on historical maps:

This past summer we did research on toponym detection and recognition on historical maps. Overall, our research goal was making historical maps more search-friendly and making information in the maps more accessible. Kitt Nika and Shen Zhang worked on detecting text strings on map images with maximally stable extremal regions (MSER). With this, they implemented a binarization method for future research in text detection. Kitt will discuss MSERs and the methods involving them in regards to text detection. Toby Baratta and Bo Wang worked on linking geographic datasets and recognizing toponyms from the detected text strings. With the alignment between historical maps and real-life geography, we used a Bayesian model to calculate probabilities of possible toponyms. Toby and Bo will discuss their work on increasing the range of our recognition system by adding area features such as lakes.

At 4:15 p.m., refreshments will be served in the Computer Science Commons. The talk, “Historical map processing: text detectors, database linking, and region models,” will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Off-campus study and computer science"

On Thursday, November 6, Professor Janet Davis and Richard Bright, Director of Off-Campus Study, will lead a discussion of options for combining off-campus study with study of computer science. CS majors who have studied abroad are welcome to come share their experiences.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The presentation, “Off-campus study and computer science,” will begin at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Summer experiences in computer science"

On Thursday, November 7, Chike Abuah 2014, Aaltan Ahmad 2014, Nediyana Daskalova 2014, Erik Opavsky 2014, Kim Spasaro 2014, Daniel Torres 2015, and Brennan Wallace 2016 will conduct a panel discussion on summer experiences in computer science. The participants will describe their internship experiences, ranging from start-ups to Apple to research and more.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The panel discussion will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Graduate school in computer science: what? why? how? when? who?"

On Thursday, October 10, Professor Jerod Weinman will discuss what graduate school in computer science is like, why you might consider it, what opportunities there are for graduate education, employment after graduate school, the application process (for computer science or related fields in particular), and other related issues attendees may be interested in.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The panel, Graduate school in computer science: what? why? how? when? who? will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "My Microsoft internship"

On Thursday, September 26, Jennelle Nystrom 2014 will describe her summer work experience. She writes:

In this presentation I will cover my experience working as a Program Manager at Microsoft over the summer. Specifically, I will talk about my experiences coordinating Scrum with a team of developers, and describe how different feature teams work together within the company.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “My Microsoft internship,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Computational linguistics: crawling the Web for non-English data"

On Thursday, September 19, Kim Spasaro 2014 will discuss the construction of an digital collection of written text in a specific language. She writes:

This summer I interned with Carnegie Mellon's Language Technologies Institute. While there, I was part of a project working to enable machine translation for Bantu languages. More specifically, I was responsible for building a corpus of Kinyarwanda phrases to be used for machine learning. At this talk, I will discuss how I used the Apache Nutch web crawler to launch a large-scale web crawl in search of Kinyarwanda data.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Computational linguistics: crawling the Web for non-English data,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Generative art and the computer collaborator"

On Thursday, May 2, Colin Brooks 2013 will speak on “Generative art and the computer collaborator.” Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra: "Building knowledge and confidence with mediascripting"

On Thursday, February 28, Professors Sam Rebelsky, Janet Davis, and Jerod Weinman will discuss the rationale for using media scripting in our introductory computer science course:

Grinnell's CSC 151 draws upon concepts of media computation to motivate students and to provide more visual feedback that helps students better understand the algorithms they write. At the same time, CSC 151 encourages students to think about computing (and image making) in multiple ways. In this talk, a preview of a talk we will give at the SIGCSE Symposium on Computer Science Education, we discuss the inception of the course, what we see as key design points of the course, and the ways in which we have assessed the efficacy of the course. Since the introduction of this new version of 151, we have seen significant increases in enrollment and diversity. Assessments suggest that the course helps students develop deep knowledge that is atypical of an introductory course and also builds confidence.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, “Building knowledge and confidence with mediascripting: a successful interdisciplinary approach to CS1,” will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Thursday Extra

On Thursday, February 7, Martin Estrada 2014 and June Yolcuepa 2015 will discuss their summer 2012 research work and give their views of the future of our introductory course, CSC 151.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

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