Thursday Extra: "Squeezing the MathLAN"

On Thursday, October 28, in Noyce 3821, Martin Dluhos 2012 will describe one of the major system-administration projects he carried out this summer: configuring and using software that automate the installation of a new version of Debian GNU/Linux on the workstations in the MathLAN, in order to make the entire process less tedious and less repetitive.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, Squeezing the MathLAN, will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

CS Table / CSC 295, October 15: Internet voting

This Friday at CS Table, we'll talk about the possible use of the Internet as a medium for casting ballots in elections in the United States. Here are some readings to inform and point up the discussion:

As usual, we'll meet at noon or a little after, in Rosenfield 224A.

CS Table/CSC 295, Oct. 8: Surveillance & TCP/IP Packet Structure

This Friday at CS Table, Simon and Jeff will present the information contained in packet headers and lead a continued discussion on network surveillance. We suggest the following reading (as much as you have interest or time for):

*ResNet Guidelines and Policies
*Ellen Nakashima, US seeks ways to wiretap the InternetWashington Post, Sept 27, 2010.
*Paul Ohm, When Network Neutrality Met Privacy, CACM 53(4):30-32, April 2010.
*Kristina Irion, International Communications Surveillance, CACM 52(2):26-28, Feb 2009.
*TCP Protocol Layers Explained, Dru Lavigne, ONLamp.com, March 14, 2001.
*Capturing TCP Packets, Dru Lavigne, ONLamp.com, March 21, 2001.
*IP Packets Revealed, Dru Lavigne, ONLamp.com, March 28, 2001.

As usual, we'll meet a little after noon in JRC 224A.

Students who are registered for CSC 295: We'll be doing sign-ups for after fall break. Please bring your calendars!

Thursday Extra: "Delivering groceries in Seattle"

On Thursday, October 7, in Noyce 3821, Shitanshu Aggarwal 2011 will describe the software-development project on which he worked last summer. He writes:

During the Summer of 2010, I interned at Amazon's online grocery business, Amazon Fresh. It is an experimental project and is currently being tested in the Seattle area in Washington. In this talk, I will describe how an online grocery store operates, the computational problems that arise in their operation, and my contributions to Amazon's project.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, Delivering groceries in Seattle, will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

CS Table/CSC 295, October 1, 2010: Password reuse; is Google evil?

This Friday at CS Table, Dr. Rebelsky and I will be presenting the XCKD comic "Password Reuse".

To add some seriousness to the conversation, please also read

As usual, we'll be meeting at noon in JRC 224A. Hope to see you there!

Thursday Extra: "Software for the submission and review of conference proposals"

At 4:15 on Thursday, September 30, in Noyce 3821, Professor Henry Walker will give a talk about software that he and his students have developed for the management of proposals for presenting research papers at conferences. In 1999, Mr. Walker was asked to develop the first iteration of a Web-based paper submissions and reviewing system. The current system represents the twelfth version of this software, and each version has implemented refinements, new capabilities, and adjustments. Reflections on the evolution of this system yield numerous lessons for software and Web-based systems. This talk discusses 10 (hexadecimal) observations that can help in the design of future software applications.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, Software for the submission and review of conference proposals: 10 (hexadecimal) lessons, will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

CS Table/CSC 295, Friday, Sept 24: Quality of Service & Net Neutrality

This Friday at CS Table, Isaac and Josh will be leading a discussion about quality of service and network neutrality. The popular press articles are concerned with recent regulatory proposals:

Technical readings from Wikipedia are concerned with existing Internet service models:

As usual, we meet at noon in JRC 224A. Hope to see you there!

CS Table/CSC 295: DNS & Denial of Service Attacks

*United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT), Understanding Denial-of-Service Attacks, November 4, 2004.
*R. Singel, Twitter, Facebook attacks no surprise to security experts, Wired.com, August 6, 2009.
*R. Singel, Is there rhyme or reason to the attacks on Twitter?, Wired.com, August 6, 2009.
Domain Name System (Wikipedia).
ICANN Security and Stability Advisory Committee (SSAC), DNS Distributed Denial of Service, March 2006.

Also worth reading, not required: J. Davis (not me), Secret Geek A-Team Hacks Back, Defends Worldwide Web, Wired 16.12, November 24, 2008.

Presenters: Martin & Max

Thursday Extra: "Exploring persuasive technology through participatory design"

At 4:15 on Thursday, September 16, in Noyce 3821, Professor Janet Davis will give a talk based on research conducted during her sabbatical last year:

Persuasive technology, in the words of B.J. Fogg, is technology to change what we think and do. Though technology can help us change our behavior for the better, persuasive technology raises ethical questions concerning both the means and the ends of the persuasion. Participatory design, with its commitment to engaging future users as full partners in the design process, is one approach to addressing such concerns. In this talk, I will present my participatory design work with Grinnell College's EcoHouse to design technology to support them in their mission of sustainable living.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, Exploring persuasive technology through participatory design, will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

CS Table/CSC 295, Friday, September 10: Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam, SMTP, and Spam

This Friday, Jesse and Shitanshu will be leading a discussion on the SMTP application-level protocol and one of its most popular uses, spam. Please read this article:

For additional background, also read about SMTP.

As usual, we'll be meeting in JRC 224A at noon. Hope to see you there!

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