Thursday Extra: "Summer opportunities in computer science"

It's never to soon to think about what you're going to do next summer! While summer may seem far away, taking advantage of some of the better summer opportunities requires advance planning—for example, some programs have deadlines in January or February.

On Thursday, December 6, Professor Sam Rebelsky will discuss typical off-campus summer options available in computer science—research, internships, and more—and suggest strategies for developing your applications. (At a separate session early next semester, the CS faculty will describe summer research opportunities available at Grinnell.)

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). Professor Rebelsky's presentation will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: Evolutionary art

At this Friday's CS Table/Algorithmic Arts session (at noon in Rosenfield 224A) we will consider some basic issues in Evolutionary Art, art which is generated by genetic-like processes. Our reading this week is

Lewis, Matthew (2008). Evolutionary visual art and design. In Romero and Machado (eds.), The art of artificial evolution: a handbook of evolutionary art and music.

Copies of the reading are available outside Professor Rebelsky's office (Noyce 3824). Please make sure to do the whole reading so that our discussion is productive. Spencer and Chike will lead the discussion.

Thursday Extra: "NoSQL"

On Thursday, November 29, Tolu Alabi will describe a widely used non-relational database. She writes:

NoSQL is a new database technology used to store large data. Instead of storing lots of data on one machine, data can be distributed across multiple machines, thereby reducing the load on a single machine. NoSQL is also used to replicate data across multiple nodes. If data is replicated across multiple nodes, one is no longer at the mercy of a single node. So if a single node dies, the data is still available and accessible from another node.

Many big companies have switched from the traditional SQL -like database to NoSQL-like database because of these two major reasons. Come to my talk to learn more about the advantages of using NoSQL.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, NoSQL, will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: A programming language for artists

This Friday at Algorithmic Arts (+ CS Table), we will consider some portions of John Maeda's book Design by numbers, which provides a simple programming language for artists.

Meada, John (1999). Design by numbers. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

The sections include the preface and introduction, a chapter on repetition, and two chapters on dots. There are also a number of images from the book.

For folks who haven't been to CS table lately, this reading gives us some opportunity to talk about language design issues as well as artistic issues.

Copies of the readings are available outside Professor Rebelsky's office. Kate and Tolu will lead our discussion and have asked participants to consider the following questions:

  • How might you create the images from the book (not the ones with the accompanying code)?
  • What's the smallest set of functions you would need to make these images?

Thursday Extra: "Self-Disclosing GIMP with MediaScript"

On Thursday, November 15, Sarah Henney 2013 and Martha Fletcher 2015 will describe their summer internship work on the MediaScheme project:

Self-Disclosing GIMP(SDGimp) is an ongoing project with the goal of adding self-disclosure functionality tailored to the MediaScheme library into the GIMP. In short, SDGimp will allow a user to perform an action in the GIMP and then view the Scheme expression which can be used to duplicate that action.

In this Extra, we will discuss and demonstrate our work from this summer on SDGimp, including our expansion of the MediaScheme library to include more actions from the GIMP.

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, Self-disclosing GIMP with MediaScript, will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: Early computer artists' writings on computer art

At this Friday's CS Table/Algorithmic Arts session (at noon in Rosenfield 224A) we will consider some writings by a variety of early practitioners of computer art, published as the art was actually being produced. These articles are taken from

Rosen, Margit, Ed. (2011). A little-known story about a movement, a magazine, and the computer's arrival in art: new tendencies and Bit international, 1961-1973.

The particular readings are
  • Franke, Herbert W. (orig. 1971, translation 2011). Social aspects of computer art (pp. 435-437).
  • Morellet, Francois (orig. 1962, translation 2011). The case for programmed experimental painting (pp. 92-93).
  • Munari, Bruno (orig. 1964, reprinted 2011). Arte programmata (p. 176).
  • Nake, Frieder (orig. 1968). There should be no computer art (pp. 466-467).
  • Nees, Georg (orig. 1968, translation 2011). Computer graphics and visual translations (pp. 320-325).

Copies of the readings are available outside Professor Rebelsky's office (Noyce 3824). Please complete the reading in advance so that our discussion is productive. Colin and Sinan will lead our discussion.

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: Computer art and constructivism

At this Friday's CS Table/Algorithmic Arts session (at noon in Rosenfield 224A) we will discuss the relationship of computer art to some pre-computer approaches, particularly constructivism.

Our reading discusses the ways in which artists have attempted to forefront process and instructions in their work:

Wright, Richard. From System to Software: Computer Programming and the Death of Constructivist Art. In Brown, et al., eds. White Heat Cold Logic: British Computer Art 1960-1980.

Copies of the reading are available outside Professor Rebelsky's office (Noyce 3824). Please make sure to do the whole reading so that our discussion is productive. Jennelle will lead our discussion.

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: Digital pioneers

Since it's nearing fall break time, this Friday's CS Table/Algorithmic Arts session (at noon in Rosenfield 224A) will be comparatively laid back. We will explore a variety of historic pieces of digital arts from the collection of the Victoria and Albert museum and we will consider the second half of the semester (revisiting readings, getting volunteers to lead, etc.)

In preparation for the discussion, please review the images at http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/~rebelsky/Courses/CSC295/2012F/DigitalPioneers/. In addition, please review the class schedule at http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/~rebelsky/Courses/CSC295/2012F/Handouts/schedule.html.

Erik Opavsky will lead the discussion of images. Sam Rebelsky will lead the discussion of the schedule.

Thursday Extra: "Technical internships"

On Thursday, October 18, Dilan Ustek 2014, Aditi Roy 2013, Tolu Alabi 2013, Maijid Moujaled 2014, and David Cowden 2013 will discuss the technical internships they have done at Microsoft, Amazon, Goldman Sachs, Pikuzone, and Iowa Health System. They will talk about their experiences at big technical companies, a start-up, and the IT department of a health organization. Come to learn about these various experiences and what to do in order to get them!

Refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. in the Computer Science Commons (Noyce 3817). The talk, Technical internships, will follow at 4:30 p.m. in Noyce 3821. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Algorithmic arts / CS Table: Live coding

This Friday at CS Table, we will discuss “live coding,” a form of performance art that typically involves sound, image, and visible code. (It's a bit more complex than that, as the readings suggest.) Jennelle and Colin will lead the the discussion.

The readings:

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